Week 3 Roll Call

Historical Scholarship of the Modern Middle East, Late Ottoman Empire
Topic: Early modern history and historiography

Kafadar, Cemal. “Ottomans and Europe.” In Thomas A. Brady, Jr., Heiko A. Oberman, James D. Tracy, eds., Handbook in European History, 1400-1600: Late Middle Ages, Renaissance, and Reformation. Grand Rapids, MI: W. B. Eerdmans, 1996: 589-628.
Summary: Kafadar provides an overview of Ottoman history from 1400 to 1600 and suggests that the oft-cited European-Ottoman, East-West dichotomy is not accurate for this time period, as they shared many institutions and social and cultural patterns as early modern societies.

Tezcan, Baki. The Second Ottoman Empire: Political and Social Transformation in the Early Modern World. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2010.
Summary: Tezcan argues that the characterization of the 16th century Ottoman empire as an empire in decline is inaccurate; rather, it was a prime example of an early modern polity, one characterized by shifting socioeconomic conditions defined by the monetization of the economy.

Historical Studies of Women and Gender
Topic: State-building, religion and gender: early modern Germany

Pateman, Carole. “The Fraternal Social Contract.” In The Disorder of Women: Democracy, Feminism, and Political Theory. Stanford:  Stanford University Press, 1990: 33-57.
Summary: Pateman challenges the notion that liberalism is inherently inclusive of all individuals within a society by examining the works of contract theorists, their critics, and others who discussed contract theory through a feminist lens. In order to counter the patriarchy inherent to the fraternal social contract, the understanding of the body politic must be dismantled so that definitions of citizenship are not based on the patriarchal separation of private and public, but rather on individuality and sexual identities as feminine and masculine beings.

Pateman, Carole. “Feminist Critiques of the Public/Private Dichotomy.” In The Disorder of Women: Democracy, Feminism, and Political Theory. Stanford:  Stanford University Press, 1990: 118-40.
Summary: In this chapter, Pateman argues that in order to rid ourselves of the patriarchy inherent to the public/private dichotomy of liberalism, a social theory must be developed that acknowledges the mutually constitutive relationship of the public and the private.

Strasser,Ulrike. State of Virginity: Gender, Religion, and Politics in an Early Modern Catholic State. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2004.
Summary: In this work, Ulrike examines the early modern Bavarian capital of Munich to reveal the importance of gendered narratives of religion and politics in state power and the creation of a centralized political state through the policing of women’s sexualized and classed bodies.

Strasser, Ulrike, and Heidi Tinsman. “Engendering World History.” Radical History Review 91 (Winter 2005): 151-164.
Summary: An interesting pedagogical piece about a world history survey course the author co-taught in which they used gender as their centralizing theme.

Week 1 and 2 Roll Call

I apologize for being a little behind on my weekly list. Lucky for you though, I’ve got a two-for-one kind of deal going on this week – two roll calls in one! So, without further ado…

Historical Scholarship of the Modern Middle East, Late Ottoman Empire

Week 1

Berkes, Niyazi. The Development of Secularism in Turkey. Montreal: McGill University Press, 1964. [reprinted in 1998 by Routledge; this is the version I used]

Week 2

Lerner, Daniel. The Passing of Traditional Society. Glencoe, IL: The Free Press, 1958. (selected chapters)

Lewis, Bernard. The Emergence of Modern Turkey. London: Oxford University Press, 1961.

Masters, Bruce. The Arabs of the Ottoman Empire. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2013.

Historical Studies of Women and Gender

Week 1
Topic: The history of women and gender: experience and discourse

Hershatter, Gail. “The Gender of Memory: Rural Chinese Women and the 1950s.” Signs 28, no. 1 (2002): 43-70.

Higginbotham, Evelyn Brooks. “African-American Women’s History and the Metalanguage of Race.” Signs 17 (Winter 1992): 251-274.

Offen, Karen. “History of Women.” In Oxford Encyclopedia of Women in World History, 463-71.

Passerini, Luisa. “Women’s Personal Narratives: Myths, Experiences, and Emotions.” In Joy Webster, et al, eds., Interpreting Women’s Lives: Feminist Theory and Personal Narrative. Bloomington: University of Indiana Press, 1989: 189-197.

Scott, Joan. “Gender: A Useful Category of Historical Analysis.” American Historical Review 91, no. 5 (1986): 1053-1075.

Scott, Joan. “Revisiting ‘Gender: A Useful Category of Historical Analysis.’” American Historical Review 113, no. 5 (December 2008): 1334-1430.

Scott, Joan. “The Evidence of Experience.” Critical Inquiry 17, no. 4 (1991): 773-797.

Week 2
Topic: Feminist anthropology and the body: women in medieval Europe

Bynum, Caroline Walker. Holy Feast, Holy Fast: The Religious Significance of Food to Medieval Women. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1987. (selections)

Caciola, Nancy. “Mystics, Demoniacs, and the Psychology of Spirit Possession in Medieval Europe.” Comparative Studies in Society and History 42, no. 2 (April 2000): 268-306.

Ortner, Sherry B. “Is Female to Male as Nature Is to Culture?” In Michelle Z. Rosaldo and Louise Lamphere, eds., Women, Culture, and Society. Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1974: 68-87.

Class Schedule – Winter 2014

Week 1 has passed and we’re into the quarter full-swing. This quarter I’m taking Arabic, the first section of Middle East historiography that focuses on the Ottoman Empire from the 18th to the 20th centuries (Historical Scholarship of the Modern Middle East, Late Ottoman Empire), and Historical Studies of Women and Gender. Both the Middle East course and the women and gender course have great syllabi that I’m looking forward to sharing with you.

I’ve also been assigned an undergraduate class for which I’m going to be grading the midterm and final; as of last count, the class had about 75 students, but will probably whittle down to around 50. The class is outside my major field, and covers Mexico in the 19th century from decolonization to revolution (1810-1910). For it being an immediate neighbor to the south, I unfortunately know very little about Mexican history and am looking forward to learning more.

I hope you enjoy following along for the next two and a half months!

Week 9 Roll Call

Welcome to Week 9. Enjoy and Happy Thanksgiving!

Historical Scholarship of the Modern Middle East

Khalidi, Rashid, Lisa Anderson, Muhammad Muslih, and Reeva S. Simon, eds. The Origins of Arab Nationalism. New York: Columbia University Press, 1991.

Gershoni, Israel, and James Jankowski, eds. Rethinking Nationalism in the Arab Middle East. New York: Columbia University Press, 1997.

History and Theory

Crosby, Alfred. “The Past and Present of Environmental History.” The American Historical Review 100, no. 4 (October 1995): 1177-1189.

Grassby, Richard. “Material Culture and Cultural History.” Journal of Interdisciplinary History 35, no. 4 (Spring 2005): 591-603.

Mayne, Alan. “On the Edges of History: Reflections on Historical Archaeology.” American Historical Review (February 2008): 93-118.

McNeill, J. R. “The State of the Field of Environmental History.” Annual Review of Environment and Resources 35 (2010): 345-374.

Orser, Jr., Charles E. “Twenty-First-Century Historical Archaeology.” Journal of Archaeology Res 18 (2010): 111-150.

Week 8 Roll Call

Historical Scholarship of the Modern Middle East

Salibi, K. S. The Modern History of Lebanon. New York: Frederick A. Praeger, 1965.

Salibi, Kamal. A House of Many Mansions: The History of Lebanon Reconsidered. London: I.B. Tauris & Co Ltd, 1988.

Research Seminar in United States History
Topic: The Cultural Turn

Cook, James, and Lawrence Glickman. “12 Propositions for a History of U.S. Cultural History.” In James Cook, et al, eds., The Cultural Turn in U.S. History. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2009.

Enstad, Nan. “Fashioning Political Identities: Cultural Studies and the Historical Construction of Political Objects.” American Quarterly 50, no. 4 (1998): 745-782.

Imada, Adria. “Transnational Hula as Colonial Culture.” The Journal of Pacific History 46, no. 2 (2011): 149-176.

Minian, Ana. “Indiscriminate and Shameless Sex: The Strategic Use of Sexuality by the United Farm Workers.” American Quarterly 65, no. 1 (2013): 63-90.

Rieger, Bernhard. “From People’s Car to New Beetle: The Transatlantic Journeys of the Volkswagen Beetle.” Journal of American History 97, no. 1 (2010): 91-115.

Wickburg, Daniel. “Heterosexual White Male: Some Recent Inversions in American Cultural History.” Journal of American History 92, no. 1 (2005): 136-157.

Women in Arabic Literature

Rajaa Alsanea, Girls of Riyadh (excerpts)

What’s on your reading list this week?