5 Things: Podcasts

I recently got an iPad (I know, welcome to the 21st century, right?) and have become an avid listener of a variety of podcasts. While I probably enjoy listening to at least 10 different podcasts, I’ve chosen five that I can’t get enough of right now:

Stuff Mom Never Told You. This has a distinctly feminist bent, but (so?) shouldn’t preclude anyone from listening. In addition to a variety of other topics looked at from a feminist and gender perspective, earlier this summer they did a series on romantic comedies. It was great and has added several films to my must-watch list.

Stuff You Missed in History Class. These are fun and cover a variety of historical topics that, as the name suggests, you probably didn’t learn in your general education history classes. (Several weeks ago, the hosts posted to the podcast’s blog about concerns that they include “too many women” on the program. If you want to read their excellent response to that claim, click here.)

Pop Culture Happy Hour. This podcast makes me aware of how painfully unaware I am of pop culture. But they did do an episode on “Bob’s Burgers” last month that was something I know about before listening.

Ottoman History Podcast. This obviously aligns more to my particular professional and academic interests, but, like “Stuff You Missed in History Class,” the hosts and guests provide you with a look at the past that you probably never got. They also do a good job at showing how history isn’t just memorizing a bunch of names and dates.

Sit’N Listen. This comes from Harvard University’s graduate student organization, Science in the News (SITN), and has so far discussed a number of topics, ranging from GMOs to the construction of sex and gender in science (spoiler from the latter: science isn’t as objective as we like to think it is!).

Bonus for those who like politics: Off Message and The Axe Files are two I’ve been listening to lately.

Since I’m a podcast neophyte, I’d be happy to hear your recommendations in the comments!

Week 8 Roll Call

Historical Scholarship of the Modern Middle East

Salibi, K. S. The Modern History of Lebanon. New York: Frederick A. Praeger, 1965.

Salibi, Kamal. A House of Many Mansions: The History of Lebanon Reconsidered. London: I.B. Tauris & Co Ltd, 1988.

Research Seminar in United States History
Topic: The Cultural Turn

Cook, James, and Lawrence Glickman. “12 Propositions for a History of U.S. Cultural History.” In James Cook, et al, eds., The Cultural Turn in U.S. History. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2009.

Enstad, Nan. “Fashioning Political Identities: Cultural Studies and the Historical Construction of Political Objects.” American Quarterly 50, no. 4 (1998): 745-782.

Imada, Adria. “Transnational Hula as Colonial Culture.” The Journal of Pacific History 46, no. 2 (2011): 149-176.

Minian, Ana. “Indiscriminate and Shameless Sex: The Strategic Use of Sexuality by the United Farm Workers.” American Quarterly 65, no. 1 (2013): 63-90.

Rieger, Bernhard. “From People’s Car to New Beetle: The Transatlantic Journeys of the Volkswagen Beetle.” Journal of American History 97, no. 1 (2010): 91-115.

Wickburg, Daniel. “Heterosexual White Male: Some Recent Inversions in American Cultural History.” Journal of American History 92, no. 1 (2005): 136-157.

Women in Arabic Literature

Rajaa Alsanea, Girls of Riyadh (excerpts)

What’s on your reading list this week?

Week 3 Roll Call

Hello again, all. Here’s the reading list for this week (luckily, I’ve already read all these and it’s on to the next!). Enjoy!

Historical Scholarship of the Modern Middle East

Anderson, Benedict. Imagined Communities: Reflections on the Origin and Spread of Nationalism. London: Verso, 1983.

Hodgson, Marshall. The Venture of Islam: Conscience and History in a World Civilization vol. 1. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 1974. (Introduction only)

Research Seminar in United States History

Anjal, Arondkar. “Without a Trace: Sexuality and the Colonial Archive.” Journal of the History of Sexuality 14, no. 1-2 (Jan-April 2005): 10-27.

Brown, Richard, and Beth Davis-Brown. “The Making of Memory: The Politics of Archives, Libraries, and Museums in the Construction of National Consciousness.” History of the Human Sciences 11, no. 4 (November 1998): 17-32.

Dick, Lyle. “The 1942 Same-Sex Trials in Edmonton: On the State’s Repression of Sexual Minorities, Archives, and Human Rights in Canada.” Archivaria 68 (Fall 2009): 183-217.

Dominy, Graham. “Overcoming the Apartheid Legacy: The Special Case of the Freedom Charter.” Archival Science 13, no. 2-3 (June 2013): 195-205.

Gutiérrez, Rámon. “Women on Top: The Love Magic of the Indian Witches of New Mexico.” Journal of the History of Sexuality 16, no. 3 (September 2007): 373-390.

Samonte, Cecilia. “Obtaining ‘Sympathetic Understanding’: Gender, Empire, and Representation in the Travel Writings of American Officials’ Wives, 1901-1914.” The Journal of Transnational American Studies 3, no. 2 (2011): 1-14.

Stoler, Ann. “Colonial Archives and the Arts of Governance.” Archival Science 2, no. 2 (2002): 87-109.

History and Theory

Burke, Peter. “Strengths and Weaknesses of Cultural History.” Cultural History 1, no. 1 (2012): 1-13.

Cook, James W. “The Kids Are All Right: On the ‘Turning’ of Cultural History.” American Historical Review (June 2012): 746-771.

Hoffman, Philip T. “Opening Our Eyes: History and the Social Sciences.” The Journal of the Historical Society 1, no. 1 (March 2006): 93-117.

Scott, Joan W. “Unanswered Questions.” American Historical Review (December 2008): 1422-1430.

Scott, Joan W. “Gender: A Useful Category of Historical Analysis.” The American Historical Review 91, no. 5 (December 1986): 1053-1075.

Women in Arabic Literature

Nawal El-Saadawi, The Hidden Face of Eve: Women in the Arab World (excerpts)

Fatima Mernissi, The Forgotten Queens of Islam (excerpts)

 

Has anyone read any of these? Any thoughts?