Week 1 and 2 Roll Call

I apologize for being a little behind on my weekly list. Lucky for you though, I’ve got a two-for-one kind of deal going on this week – two roll calls in one! So, without further ado…

Historical Scholarship of the Modern Middle East, Late Ottoman Empire

Week 1

Berkes, Niyazi. The Development of Secularism in Turkey. Montreal: McGill University Press, 1964. [reprinted in 1998 by Routledge; this is the version I used]

Week 2

Lerner, Daniel. The Passing of Traditional Society. Glencoe, IL: The Free Press, 1958. (selected chapters)

Lewis, Bernard. The Emergence of Modern Turkey. London: Oxford University Press, 1961.

Masters, Bruce. The Arabs of the Ottoman Empire. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2013.

Historical Studies of Women and Gender

Week 1
Topic: The history of women and gender: experience and discourse

Hershatter, Gail. “The Gender of Memory: Rural Chinese Women and the 1950s.” Signs 28, no. 1 (2002): 43-70.

Higginbotham, Evelyn Brooks. “African-American Women’s History and the Metalanguage of Race.” Signs 17 (Winter 1992): 251-274.

Offen, Karen. “History of Women.” In Oxford Encyclopedia of Women in World History, 463-71.

Passerini, Luisa. “Women’s Personal Narratives: Myths, Experiences, and Emotions.” In Joy Webster, et al, eds., Interpreting Women’s Lives: Feminist Theory and Personal Narrative. Bloomington: University of Indiana Press, 1989: 189-197.

Scott, Joan. “Gender: A Useful Category of Historical Analysis.” American Historical Review 91, no. 5 (1986): 1053-1075.

Scott, Joan. “Revisiting ‘Gender: A Useful Category of Historical Analysis.’” American Historical Review 113, no. 5 (December 2008): 1334-1430.

Scott, Joan. “The Evidence of Experience.” Critical Inquiry 17, no. 4 (1991): 773-797.

Week 2
Topic: Feminist anthropology and the body: women in medieval Europe

Bynum, Caroline Walker. Holy Feast, Holy Fast: The Religious Significance of Food to Medieval Women. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1987. (selections)

Caciola, Nancy. “Mystics, Demoniacs, and the Psychology of Spirit Possession in Medieval Europe.” Comparative Studies in Society and History 42, no. 2 (April 2000): 268-306.

Ortner, Sherry B. “Is Female to Male as Nature Is to Culture?” In Michelle Z. Rosaldo and Louise Lamphere, eds., Women, Culture, and Society. Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1974: 68-87.

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Class Schedule – Winter 2014

Week 1 has passed and we’re into the quarter full-swing. This quarter I’m taking Arabic, the first section of Middle East historiography that focuses on the Ottoman Empire from the 18th to the 20th centuries (Historical Scholarship of the Modern Middle East, Late Ottoman Empire), and Historical Studies of Women and Gender. Both the Middle East course and the women and gender course have great syllabi that I’m looking forward to sharing with you.

I’ve also been assigned an undergraduate class for which I’m going to be grading the midterm and final; as of last count, the class had about 75 students, but will probably whittle down to around 50. The class is outside my major field, and covers Mexico in the 19th century from decolonization to revolution (1810-1910). For it being an immediate neighbor to the south, I unfortunately know very little about Mexican history and am looking forward to learning more.

I hope you enjoy following along for the next two and a half months!

Week 9 Roll Call

Welcome to Week 9. Enjoy and Happy Thanksgiving!

Historical Scholarship of the Modern Middle East

Khalidi, Rashid, Lisa Anderson, Muhammad Muslih, and Reeva S. Simon, eds. The Origins of Arab Nationalism. New York: Columbia University Press, 1991.

Gershoni, Israel, and James Jankowski, eds. Rethinking Nationalism in the Arab Middle East. New York: Columbia University Press, 1997.

History and Theory

Crosby, Alfred. “The Past and Present of Environmental History.” The American Historical Review 100, no. 4 (October 1995): 1177-1189.

Grassby, Richard. “Material Culture and Cultural History.” Journal of Interdisciplinary History 35, no. 4 (Spring 2005): 591-603.

Mayne, Alan. “On the Edges of History: Reflections on Historical Archaeology.” American Historical Review (February 2008): 93-118.

McNeill, J. R. “The State of the Field of Environmental History.” Annual Review of Environment and Resources 35 (2010): 345-374.

Orser, Jr., Charles E. “Twenty-First-Century Historical Archaeology.” Journal of Archaeology Res 18 (2010): 111-150.

Week 8 Roll Call

Historical Scholarship of the Modern Middle East

Salibi, K. S. The Modern History of Lebanon. New York: Frederick A. Praeger, 1965.

Salibi, Kamal. A House of Many Mansions: The History of Lebanon Reconsidered. London: I.B. Tauris & Co Ltd, 1988.

Research Seminar in United States History
Topic: The Cultural Turn

Cook, James, and Lawrence Glickman. “12 Propositions for a History of U.S. Cultural History.” In James Cook, et al, eds., The Cultural Turn in U.S. History. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2009.

Enstad, Nan. “Fashioning Political Identities: Cultural Studies and the Historical Construction of Political Objects.” American Quarterly 50, no. 4 (1998): 745-782.

Imada, Adria. “Transnational Hula as Colonial Culture.” The Journal of Pacific History 46, no. 2 (2011): 149-176.

Minian, Ana. “Indiscriminate and Shameless Sex: The Strategic Use of Sexuality by the United Farm Workers.” American Quarterly 65, no. 1 (2013): 63-90.

Rieger, Bernhard. “From People’s Car to New Beetle: The Transatlantic Journeys of the Volkswagen Beetle.” Journal of American History 97, no. 1 (2010): 91-115.

Wickburg, Daniel. “Heterosexual White Male: Some Recent Inversions in American Cultural History.” Journal of American History 92, no. 1 (2005): 136-157.

Women in Arabic Literature

Rajaa Alsanea, Girls of Riyadh (excerpts)

What’s on your reading list this week?

Week 7 Roll Call

This week’s line up, for your viewing pleasure:

Historical Scholarship of the Modern Middle East

Hourani, Albert. “Ottoman Reform and the Politics of Notables.” In Albert Hourani, Philip S. Khoury, Mary C. Wilson, eds., The Modern Middle East: A Reader. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1993, 83-109.

Khoury, Philip S. Urban Notables and Arab Nationalism: The Politics of Damascus 1860-1920. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1983.

Research Seminar in United States History

Bald, Vivek. “Overlapping Diasporas, Multiracial Lives: South Asian Muslims in U.S. Communities of Color, 1880-1950.” Souls: A Critical Journal of Black Politics 8, no. 4 (2006): 1-21.

Chang, David. “Borderlands in a World at Sea: Concow Indians, Native Hawaiians, and South Chinese in Indigenous, Global, and National Spaces.” Journal of American History 98, no. 2 (2011): 384-403.

Lee, Erika. “Enforcing the Borders: Chinese Exclusion along the U.S. Borders with Canada and Mexico, 1882-1924.” Journal of American History 89, no. 1 (2002): 54-86.

Molina, Natalia. “The Power of Racial Scripts: What the History of Mexican Immigration to the United States Teaches Us about Relational Notions of Race.” Latino Studies8, no. 2 (2010): 156-175.

Siegel, Micol. “Beyond Compare: Comparative Method after the Transnational Turn.” Radical History Review 91 (2005): 62-90.

History and Theory

Brewer, John. “Microhistory and the Histories of Everyday Life.” Cultural and Social History 7, no.1 (2010): 87-109.

Brown, Richard D. “Mircohistory and the Post-Modern Challenge.” Journal of the Early Republic 23, no. 1 (Spring 2003): 1-20.

Kertzer, David I. “Social Anthropology and Social Science History.” Social Science History 33, no. 1 (Spring 2009): 1-16.

Magnusson, Sighurdhur Gylfi. “Social History as ‘Sites of the Memory’? The Institutionalization of History: Microhistory and the Grant Narrative.” Journal of Social History 39, no. 3 (2006): 891-913.

Trivellato, Francesca. “Is There a Future for Italian Microhistory in the Age of Global History?” California Italian Studies 2, no. 1 (2011): 1-26.

Women in Arabic Literature

Ahlam Mostaghanemi, Memory of the Flesh (excerpts, continued)

We also attended a lecture for class this week that was given by a professor of comparative literature from the University of Oregon on world history, Taha Hussein, and Andre Gide. It was a good talk.

What’s on your reading list for the week? Have you been to any good talks lately?

Week 6 Roll Call

Historical Scholarship of the Modern Middle East
Dawn, C. Ernest. From Ottomanism to Arabism: Essays on the Origins of Arab Nationalism. Chicago: University of Illinois Press, 1973.
Hourani, Albert. Arabic Thought in the Liberal Age, 1789-1939. Oxford University Press: United Kingdom, 1962.
Zeine, Zeine N. Arab-Turkish Relations and the Emergence of Arab Nationalism. Beirut, Lebanon: Khayat’s, 1958.
Research Seminar in United States History
Bender, Thomas. “Historians, the Nation, and the Plentitude of Narratives.” In Thomas Bender, ed., Rethinking American History in a Global Age. Berkeley: UC Press, 2002, 1-22.Chang, Kornel. “Circulating Race and Empire: Transnational Labor Activism and the Politics of Anti-Asian Agitation in the Anglo-American Pacific World, 1880-1910.” Journal of American History 96, no. 3 (2009): 678-701.

Gutierrez, Ramon, and Elliot Young. “Transnationalizing Borderlands History.” Western Historical Quarterly 41, no. 1 (2010): 26-53.

Kelley, Robin D. G. “How the West Was One: The African Diaspora and the Re-mapping of U.S. History.” In Thomas Bender, ed., Rethinking American History in a Global Age. Berkeley: UC Press, 2002, 123-147.

Smallwood, Stephanie. “African Guardians, European Slave Ships, and the Changing Dynamics of Power in the Early Modern Atlantic.” The William and Mary Quarterly 64, no. 4 (2007): 679-716.

History and Theory
This week’s theme: Cliometrics and Geography

Bodenhamer, David J. “Beyond GIS: Geospatial Technologies and the Future of History.” In History and GIS: Epistemologies, Considerations and Reflections, In A. von Lünen and C. Travis, eds. Dordrecht: Spring Science+Business Media, 2013, 1-13.

Greasley, David, and Les Oxley. “Clio and the Economist: Making Historians Count.” Journal of Economic Surveys 24, no. 5 (2010): 755-774.

Mayhew, Robert J. “Historical Geography, 2009-2010: Geohistory, the Forgotten Braudel and the Place of Nominalism.” Progress in Human Geography 35, no. 3 (2010): 409-421.

Owens, J. B. “Toward a Geographically-Integrated, Connected World History: Employing Geographic Information Systems (GIS).” History Compass 5/6 (2007): 2014-2040.

Schlichting, Kurt. “Historical GIS: New Ways of Doing History.” Historical Methods: A Journal of Quantitative and Interdisciplinary History 41, no. 4 (2008): 191-196.

Women in Arabic Literature

Hanan al-Shaykh, Only in London (excerpts)

Ahlam Mostaghanemi, Memory of the Flesh (excerpts)

Miscellaneous
One of the graduate students in our program is coordinating an Arabic coffee hour where a group of us choose a reading in Arabic, translate it, and then meet to go over our translation. I’ve chosen our first reading from a 1926 issue of a magazine I found when I did research at the Smithsonian for my thesis: الجديدة المرأة (The New Woman). The article is المرأة التركية الجديدة (“The Turkish New Woman”) by Halide Edib. It should be fun.

Cheers to the half-way point!

Week 5 Roll Call

This is a first for the term so far: I’m getting out my reading list before the week I tackle it, rather than after. I’m thinking some congratulations are due to myself. Two of my classes aren’t meeting this week (one reason I have time to post this now), and we’re reviewing preliminary prospectuses (i?) for another, so, all in all, a lighter reading week. With my abundant “free time”, I hope to do some significant catch-up and maybe even some getting ahead. So, without further ado, this week’s reading list:

Research Seminar in United States History

Tomlinson, Barbara, and George Lipsitz. “American Studies as Accompaniment.” American Quarterly 65, no. 1 (2013): 1-30.

Women in Arabic Literature

Ghada Samman, The Square Moon: Supernatural Tales (excerpts)

Sahar Tawfiq, Points of the Compass (excerpts)

Hanan al-Shaykh, Only in London (excerpts)

 

What readings do you have this week? What do you do with a week of “rest”?