Week 9 Roll Call

Welcome to Week 9. Enjoy and Happy Thanksgiving!

Historical Scholarship of the Modern Middle East

Khalidi, Rashid, Lisa Anderson, Muhammad Muslih, and Reeva S. Simon, eds. The Origins of Arab Nationalism. New York: Columbia University Press, 1991.

Gershoni, Israel, and James Jankowski, eds. Rethinking Nationalism in the Arab Middle East. New York: Columbia University Press, 1997.

History and Theory

Crosby, Alfred. “The Past and Present of Environmental History.” The American Historical Review 100, no. 4 (October 1995): 1177-1189.

Grassby, Richard. “Material Culture and Cultural History.” Journal of Interdisciplinary History 35, no. 4 (Spring 2005): 591-603.

Mayne, Alan. “On the Edges of History: Reflections on Historical Archaeology.” American Historical Review (February 2008): 93-118.

McNeill, J. R. “The State of the Field of Environmental History.” Annual Review of Environment and Resources 35 (2010): 345-374.

Orser, Jr., Charles E. “Twenty-First-Century Historical Archaeology.” Journal of Archaeology Res 18 (2010): 111-150.

Week 8 Roll Call

Historical Scholarship of the Modern Middle East

Salibi, K. S. The Modern History of Lebanon. New York: Frederick A. Praeger, 1965.

Salibi, Kamal. A House of Many Mansions: The History of Lebanon Reconsidered. London: I.B. Tauris & Co Ltd, 1988.

Research Seminar in United States History
Topic: The Cultural Turn

Cook, James, and Lawrence Glickman. “12 Propositions for a History of U.S. Cultural History.” In James Cook, et al, eds., The Cultural Turn in U.S. History. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2009.

Enstad, Nan. “Fashioning Political Identities: Cultural Studies and the Historical Construction of Political Objects.” American Quarterly 50, no. 4 (1998): 745-782.

Imada, Adria. “Transnational Hula as Colonial Culture.” The Journal of Pacific History 46, no. 2 (2011): 149-176.

Minian, Ana. “Indiscriminate and Shameless Sex: The Strategic Use of Sexuality by the United Farm Workers.” American Quarterly 65, no. 1 (2013): 63-90.

Rieger, Bernhard. “From People’s Car to New Beetle: The Transatlantic Journeys of the Volkswagen Beetle.” Journal of American History 97, no. 1 (2010): 91-115.

Wickburg, Daniel. “Heterosexual White Male: Some Recent Inversions in American Cultural History.” Journal of American History 92, no. 1 (2005): 136-157.

Women in Arabic Literature

Rajaa Alsanea, Girls of Riyadh (excerpts)

What’s on your reading list this week?

Week 7 Roll Call

This week’s line up, for your viewing pleasure:

Historical Scholarship of the Modern Middle East

Hourani, Albert. “Ottoman Reform and the Politics of Notables.” In Albert Hourani, Philip S. Khoury, Mary C. Wilson, eds., The Modern Middle East: A Reader. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1993, 83-109.

Khoury, Philip S. Urban Notables and Arab Nationalism: The Politics of Damascus 1860-1920. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1983.

Research Seminar in United States History

Bald, Vivek. “Overlapping Diasporas, Multiracial Lives: South Asian Muslims in U.S. Communities of Color, 1880-1950.” Souls: A Critical Journal of Black Politics 8, no. 4 (2006): 1-21.

Chang, David. “Borderlands in a World at Sea: Concow Indians, Native Hawaiians, and South Chinese in Indigenous, Global, and National Spaces.” Journal of American History 98, no. 2 (2011): 384-403.

Lee, Erika. “Enforcing the Borders: Chinese Exclusion along the U.S. Borders with Canada and Mexico, 1882-1924.” Journal of American History 89, no. 1 (2002): 54-86.

Molina, Natalia. “The Power of Racial Scripts: What the History of Mexican Immigration to the United States Teaches Us about Relational Notions of Race.” Latino Studies8, no. 2 (2010): 156-175.

Siegel, Micol. “Beyond Compare: Comparative Method after the Transnational Turn.” Radical History Review 91 (2005): 62-90.

History and Theory

Brewer, John. “Microhistory and the Histories of Everyday Life.” Cultural and Social History 7, no.1 (2010): 87-109.

Brown, Richard D. “Mircohistory and the Post-Modern Challenge.” Journal of the Early Republic 23, no. 1 (Spring 2003): 1-20.

Kertzer, David I. “Social Anthropology and Social Science History.” Social Science History 33, no. 1 (Spring 2009): 1-16.

Magnusson, Sighurdhur Gylfi. “Social History as ‘Sites of the Memory’? The Institutionalization of History: Microhistory and the Grant Narrative.” Journal of Social History 39, no. 3 (2006): 891-913.

Trivellato, Francesca. “Is There a Future for Italian Microhistory in the Age of Global History?” California Italian Studies 2, no. 1 (2011): 1-26.

Women in Arabic Literature

Ahlam Mostaghanemi, Memory of the Flesh (excerpts, continued)

We also attended a lecture for class this week that was given by a professor of comparative literature from the University of Oregon on world history, Taha Hussein, and Andre Gide. It was a good talk.

What’s on your reading list for the week? Have you been to any good talks lately?

It’s Thursday!

Hi all.

Because it’s Thursday and I’ve procrastinated a bit today (I’m blaming the mid-quarter cold I’ve been blessed with), I’m linking you up to a Buzzfeed that, though it’s been circulating for awhile, doesn’t make it any less true.

25 Deeply Painful Ph.D. Student Problems (Besides Your Thesis)

Enjoy!

Thoughts? Agree? Disagree? Other “problems” of PhD or MA life that you’ve experienced but this article doesn’t address?

Week 6 Roll Call

Historical Scholarship of the Modern Middle East
Dawn, C. Ernest. From Ottomanism to Arabism: Essays on the Origins of Arab Nationalism. Chicago: University of Illinois Press, 1973.
Hourani, Albert. Arabic Thought in the Liberal Age, 1789-1939. Oxford University Press: United Kingdom, 1962.
Zeine, Zeine N. Arab-Turkish Relations and the Emergence of Arab Nationalism. Beirut, Lebanon: Khayat’s, 1958.
Research Seminar in United States History
Bender, Thomas. “Historians, the Nation, and the Plentitude of Narratives.” In Thomas Bender, ed., Rethinking American History in a Global Age. Berkeley: UC Press, 2002, 1-22.Chang, Kornel. “Circulating Race and Empire: Transnational Labor Activism and the Politics of Anti-Asian Agitation in the Anglo-American Pacific World, 1880-1910.” Journal of American History 96, no. 3 (2009): 678-701.

Gutierrez, Ramon, and Elliot Young. “Transnationalizing Borderlands History.” Western Historical Quarterly 41, no. 1 (2010): 26-53.

Kelley, Robin D. G. “How the West Was One: The African Diaspora and the Re-mapping of U.S. History.” In Thomas Bender, ed., Rethinking American History in a Global Age. Berkeley: UC Press, 2002, 123-147.

Smallwood, Stephanie. “African Guardians, European Slave Ships, and the Changing Dynamics of Power in the Early Modern Atlantic.” The William and Mary Quarterly 64, no. 4 (2007): 679-716.

History and Theory
This week’s theme: Cliometrics and Geography

Bodenhamer, David J. “Beyond GIS: Geospatial Technologies and the Future of History.” In History and GIS: Epistemologies, Considerations and Reflections, In A. von Lünen and C. Travis, eds. Dordrecht: Spring Science+Business Media, 2013, 1-13.

Greasley, David, and Les Oxley. “Clio and the Economist: Making Historians Count.” Journal of Economic Surveys 24, no. 5 (2010): 755-774.

Mayhew, Robert J. “Historical Geography, 2009-2010: Geohistory, the Forgotten Braudel and the Place of Nominalism.” Progress in Human Geography 35, no. 3 (2010): 409-421.

Owens, J. B. “Toward a Geographically-Integrated, Connected World History: Employing Geographic Information Systems (GIS).” History Compass 5/6 (2007): 2014-2040.

Schlichting, Kurt. “Historical GIS: New Ways of Doing History.” Historical Methods: A Journal of Quantitative and Interdisciplinary History 41, no. 4 (2008): 191-196.

Women in Arabic Literature

Hanan al-Shaykh, Only in London (excerpts)

Ahlam Mostaghanemi, Memory of the Flesh (excerpts)

Miscellaneous
One of the graduate students in our program is coordinating an Arabic coffee hour where a group of us choose a reading in Arabic, translate it, and then meet to go over our translation. I’ve chosen our first reading from a 1926 issue of a magazine I found when I did research at the Smithsonian for my thesis: الجديدة المرأة (The New Woman). The article is المرأة التركية الجديدة (“The Turkish New Woman”) by Halide Edib. It should be fun.

Cheers to the half-way point!